Week #35 (1/30 & 2/2)

This week your basket contains: potatoes, leeks, carrots, garlic, Delicata squash, beets, and Brussels sprouts.

This week’s basket contains an amazing array of colors that remind us that the veggies at this time of year are stored up summer sunshine.  Here are a few recipes to help you make use of them.


1 lb beets, halved

⅔ cup uncooked black rice (sometimes called “forbidden rice”)

1 ⅓ cup water

½ cup pecans, roughly chopped

2 cups packed, shredded raw kale

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

2 tablespoons cold-pressed flaxseed oil OR extra virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon whole grain mustard

1 clove garlic, minced

1 teaspoon dried thyme (whole, not ground)

1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste

Ground pepper, to taste

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Add beets to a sheet of parchment-lined foil. Crunch into a ball. Roast for 1 1/2 hours, until tender. Cool until comfortable to handle. Cut beets into bite-sized pieces or wedges. Add to a large bowl.  In a medium pot, add rice and 1 1/3 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 40 to 45 minutes. Fluff with a fork and add to beets, along with kale and pecans.  In a small bowl, whisk together all dressing ingredients or shake in a jar. Add to salad. Toss to combine, cover and refrigerate for at least 3 hours (overnight is best). Before serving, taste and adjusting seasoning if desired. This salad will keep in the refrigerator for 3 to 4 days.  Tip:  If you can’t find black rice, try wild rice (cook according to wild rice package directions). This would be fabulous with a little goat’s milk feta, chevre or thick yogurt on top. From The New York Times Vegetarian Thanksgiving 


1 leek,

1 tsp. red pepper flakes

3 small sweet potatoes or 1 large winter squash

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and shredded

2 cups chopped kale or other greens

5 eggs

Extra virgin olive oil

Kosher salt

black pepper

In a large, nonstick or cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons olive oil. Into the warm oil, add leeks and cook for 30 to 45 seconds, or until they are fragrant and softened. Stir in red pepper flakes, then add the shredded potatoes, stir to incorporate leeks and press into a single layer. Cook undisturbed for 3 to 5 minutes, or until a browned crust begins to form. Stir and cook for 3 minutes more. Season with salt and pepper. Stir Brussels sprouts into the potato mixture and cook, stirring frequently for another 3 to 5 minutes, or until sprouts start to wilt. Next add the kale and cook until wilted. Season with salt and pepper.  Meanwhile, in another large, greased skillet over medium-high heat, crack 5 eggs. Cook eggs until the whites are set (for over easy, flip eggs after the whites set slightly and then cook on other side for 30 seconds to a minute). Serve hash hot with a fried egg on top. 


2 medium delicata squash (about 2 pounds) or other firm winter squash

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

1/4 cup very coarsely chopped fresh sage

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh rosemary

1 1/2 cups fresh unfiltered apple cider or juice

1 cup water

2 teaspoons sherry vinegar

1 teaspoon salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Squash. If using delicata squash, peel it with a vegetable peeler, cut it lengthwise in half, and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. Cut each piece lengthwise in half again, then crosswise into 1/2-inch -thick slices. Other types of squash should be peeled with a chef’s knife, seeded, cut into 1-inch wedges, then sliced 1/2-inch thick.

Herb Butter. Melt the butter in a large (12-inch) skillet over low heat. Add the sage and rosemary and cook, stirring, until the butter just begins to turn golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Do not brown the herbs. Cooking the herbs in butter mellows their flavor and improves their texture.

Cooking the squash. Add the squash to the skillet, then the apple cider, water, vinegar, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat at an even boil until the cider has boiled down to a glaze and the squash is tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Taste and season with pepper, and additional salt if needed.   From Epicurious.com